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Joint Clusters :  Aviation Applications
 Revenue Management and Pricing

Session Information  : Monday Oct 12, 16:30 - 18:00

Title:  Joint Session AAS/TSL: Propagation of Flight Delays and Passenger Impacts II
Chair: Vikrant Vaze,Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77, Massachusetts Avenue, Room No. 1-245, Cambridge MA 02139, United States of America, vikrantv@mit.edu

Abstract Details

Title: Re-Booking Disrupted Airline Passengers While Uncertainty Still Remains
 Presenting Author: Amy Cohn,University of Michigan, 1205 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor MI 48109, United States of America, amycohn@umich.edu
 Co-Author: Lindsey Selegue,University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States of America, lasel@umich.edu
 Divakar Viswanath,University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States of America, divakar@umich.edu
 
Abstract: When a flight is extensively delayed (e.g. due to a mechanical problem), one alternative is to re-book passengers onto other itineraries. We investigate the impact of uncertainty (both on the repair time for the originally delayed flight and also potential future disruptions to other flights) on the passenger re-booking decision.
  
Title: Robust Airline Scheduling: Insights from an Empirical Analysis
 Presenting Author: Virot Chiraphadhanakul,MIT, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge MA 02139, United States of America, virot@mit.edu
 Co-Author: Cynthia Barnhart,Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, MIT, School of Engineering, Cambridge MA 02139, United States of America, cbarnhart@MIT.EDU
 
Abstract: We present some insights gained from studying several robust scheduling models including flight re-timing, aircraft re-routing, and block time adjusting, and their variants. We compare the performance of each model based on passenger-centric metrics and delay propagation and reveal trade-offs among them. The computational results are obtained from both actual historical data from an airline and output from simulation which takes into account potential recovery during the day of operation.
  
Title: Spatial and Temporal Examination of Propagated Flight Delays
 Presenting Author: Andrew Churchill,Graduate Research Assistant, University of Maryland, Dept of Civil Engineering, 1173 Martin Hall, College Park MD 20742, United States of America, churchil@umd.edu
 Co-Author: David Lovell,Associate Professor, University of Maryland, Department of Civil Engrg., 1173 Martin Hall, College Park MD 20742, United States of America, lovell@umd.edu
 
Abstract: Because aircraft typically operate several flights scheduled in close sequence to one another on a single day, propagation of delays between flights can have a serious impact on operations. We use a large database of historical records of individual flight records to identify where and when original delays occur. Delay for each flight is then categorized as either original or propagated. The spatial and temporal relationships between the original and subsequent propagated delays are examined.
  
Title: Efficient Utilization of National Air Transportation System Capacity
 Presenting Author: Vikrant Vaze,Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77, Massachusetts Avenue, Room No. 1-245, Cambridge MA 02139, United States of America, vikrantv@mit.edu
 Co-Author: Cynthia Barnhart,Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, MIT, School of Engineering, Cambridge MA 02139, United States of America, cbarnhart@MIT.EDU
 
Abstract: Frequency-based competition among US domestic airlines has led to decreasing aircraft sizes, causing airports to operate at levels close to capacity. We formulate and solve the problem of efficient utilization of available capacity as a mixed integer linear program to obtain a lower bound on system delays. Next we assess the effects of the control mechanisms and incentives on various stakeholders including passengers and airlines.